Monarch Wine Merchants

As luck would have it, our desire to break out of our wine rut coincided with the opening of an incredible new wine shop in downtown Charleston.  Located right next door to our favorite new café, The Harbinger, in North Central, Monarch Wine Merchants unlocked its doors in early June.  On its opening day, we waited a perfectly respectable 90 minutes before barging in, three-year-old in tow, excited to get a sense of the store and its offerings. We were thrilled to find a small but very well-cultivated collection of Old World wine, with a healthy mix of New World bottles.  The shop stocks a selection of everything from Airen (a Spanish white wine grape) to Zweigelt, and each of our visits has resulted in the purchase of multiple bottles of fascinating, new-to-us wines.

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We’re still working our way through our purchases, but several bottles we’ve opened have been stellar:

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AJ Adam Hofberg Riesling (2011)

We’ve had a lot of less-than-stellar Riesling, so we asked Monarch’s owner, Justin Coleman, for a bottle that would change our minds about the grape.  He recommended this bottle from Germany’s Mosel Valley.  Mission accomplished – with a perfect balance of sweetness and acidity, this wine has us eager to seek out more quality Riesling.

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Le Sot de l’Ange Rouge G

This is a sulfur dioxide-free blend of Gamay and Grolleau from the Loire Valley.  “Funnest” isn’t a word, but it should be so that we could say that this may be the funnest bottle of wine we’ve ever had.  Bring it to a party or let it bring the party to you.

 

 

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Partida Creus GT

Another natural wine, this time a Garrut from Spain.  Unfined, unfiltered and sulfur dioxide-free, this funky wine is delicious in ways that defy description.  We talked about it for hours and still couldn’t pin it down.  Clearly we need buy another to continue our “research.”

 

Monarch also has a large selection of rosé on a table that dominates the main space of the shop; we haven’t delved into it yet but it’s only a matter of time (and increasing mercury).  Given someone’s penchant for large format bottles (ahem, Tyler), one of Monarch’s double-magnums (3L) of rosé will probably be coming home with us soon.

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Monarch’s wines are mostly in the $25+ range, but they also have a wall of wines all priced under the very budget-friendly price of $18.  If we found ourselves in need for a bottle for dinner and didn’t want to spend a ton, this is absolutely where we would go.  Monarch is here to save all of us from buying wine at the grocery store.

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Basically, Monarch has something for everybody.  If you love wine, you should shop at Monarch.  If you know nothing about wine, you should shop at Monarch.  If you know everything about wine, you should shop at Monarch.

Now if you’ll excuse us, we’re off to open a bottle (or three).  Cheers!


Info:
Monarch Wine Merchants website 
1107 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403
Hours: Monday-Saturday 11am-8pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm

Dum Spiro Spero

In our last post, we talked a bit about the geographical expansion of Charleston’s restaurant scene over the past few years, so we thought we’d feature another of our favorite off-the-beaten path spots: Spero.  The look and feel of this under-the-radar restaurant (and we mean “under” literally – it sits in an unassuming strip mall in the shadow of the Ravenel Bridge) are incredibly casual, but its food is seriously good.

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Casual vibe, serious food

We first tried Spero not long after it opened in 2015.  We’d planned a quick date night and promised our babysitter we wouldn’t be long.  Cut to three hours later and a text asking when we’d be home – the food was so good and shareable and reasonably priced, we just kept ordering more.  And more.  And more.  Since then, we’ve visited Spero every few months, sampled their market-driven menu in all seasons and come away raving every single time.   Our most recent visit last week was no exception – the summer menu was refreshing and adventurous, the $4 happy hour Sauvignon blanc was tart and delicious, and the entire staff couldn’t have been nicer to us (our son is still talking about “Mr. Rob” and his high-fives).

Spero’s menu focuses on small plates (per the menu, “share it, don’t share it.  it’s your food, do what you want”) but also offers a selection of larger sandwiches and a few entrees (or “big shares”).   We’re often tempted to order ALL of the small plates, which would bust our guts but not our wallets – on last week’s menu, the 9 small plates tallied under $75 total.  We typically restrain ourselves and choose the bread flight, 3-4 small plates and a sandwich.

Let’s start with the bread flight ($6.50).  Oh, the bread flight.  We’ve eaten a lot of food in Charleston, and to be honest we can only think of one dish (the gnocchi at F.I.G.) that we talk about more.  This is probably the best restaurant bread in Charleston.  Order it and you’ll be treated to three different, homemade breads or rolls, each served with its own specially-paired butter.  On our most recent visit, we had a schmaltz biscuit with maple butter, cornbread with burnt honey miso butter and a sourdough pretzel roll with ham and mustard butter.  Each was fantastic, but for us, anything paired with Spero’s fantastic ham and mustard butter takes the proverbial cake.  This is always our first order, no matter what the day’s breads are.  (You can also order each bread individually, but really, why limit yourself like that??)

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L-R: cornbread, pretzel roll, schmaltz biscuit

Our favorite strategy at Spero is to order a lot of smaller things to share, and our first plate after the bread was the roasted beets ($7.50).  This is not the beet salad you can find on any menu in town.  These beets were roasted to soft perfection and paired with bleu cheese, buttermilk and a raspberry sauce.  We’re not usually big bleu cheese fans, but its funk nicely balanced the sweetness of the raspberry sauce.

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Beets, berries, buttermilk, bleu cheese, battlestar galactica

Next up was the simply named “Radish” dish ($7), which was definitely the most interesting plate of the night and would not be out of place on the menus of the finest-dining restaurants in Charleston.  Raw, roasted and pickled radishes were served with rosettes of tahini butter and anchovy bread crumbs.  We’ve never even thought about including radishes when roasting vegetables, but they were so good we may have to start.  The light dusting of anchovy-infused breadcrumbs gave the whole dish a fantastic extra boost of umami.

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Beautifully-plated radish dish

The North African-spiced chicken sausage was one of the two meat dishes we ordered and came with middlins rice, pickled raisins and mint ($9).  The punch from the berbere in the sausage was nicely offset by the sweetness of the raisins and the creaminess of the rice.  This was perhaps the simplest dish we ordered, but simplicity of this level is hard to execute this well.

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Chicken sausage with middlins rice, pickled raisins and mint

To complement the small plate selection, Spero offers several sandwiches that are fairly substantial and perfect to split.  This time, we broke from our standard order of the lamb barbacoa sandwich and opted to split the “Not Fried” chicken ($9.25) instead.  “Mojo-ish” chicken, tasso ham, sauerkraut and roasted red peppers on a toasted honey roll was a delicious combo, though we both agreed that it did not eclipse the lamb.

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“Not Fried” Chicken Sandwich

At this point, we were stuffed, but we had promised our tiny human dessert.  In his opinion, there’s no finer option than Spero’s milk and cookies: two chocolate chip cookies served on a silver platter with a goblet of cold milk.  (Parental pro tip: the cookies are made fresh to order, so request them when your last course is served to avoid a long wait and a lot of whining.)  Warm and gooey, the cookies were a perfect, comforting end to an adventurous meal.

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Little hands couldn’t wait!

What’s not to love about a place that looks like a dive bar, makes fine-dining-quality food and serves Miller High Life in champagne flutes and milk and cookies on a silver platter?  Spero takes its food seriously, but it has fun with it.  Beneath the colorful bird mural that dominates the restaurant’s decor is the phrase Dum Spiro Spero, which means, “While I breathe, I hope.”  (Probably not-so-coincidentally, this is also South Carolina’s state motto – thanks, Google!)  You can sure that while we breathe, we’ll hope that Spero keeps wowing us with its inventive, delicious food and boundless hospitality.  Until next time!

 

 

 

Quick Bites: The Harbinger

In the past few years, the food scene in Charleston has evolved tremendously.  Some of that evolution has been culinary (like an increased focus on locally-sourced ingredients and a proliferation of barbecue restaurants), but the most noticeable change has been a geographic one. When we first moved here, downtown Charleston’s restaurant scene was heavily concentrated on East Bay Street and the southernmost blocks of Upper King Street; you could pick one of these areas and restaurant-hop to your heart’s content, but options elsewhere were limited and somewhat isolated.

Today, good restaurants stretch across the peninsula (and over the bridges!), with frequent openings in areas that just a couple of years ago were well beyond even the fringes of the traditional dining districts.  From the beloved Park Café and the forthcoming Herd Provisions by Hampton Park to the always-packed Edmund’s Oast and Butcher and Bee (among others) in NoMo, delicious options abound wherever you find yourself in the city.  On King Street, “restaurant row” has been expanding steadily northward into the North Central neighborhood with the addition of hotspots like Leon’s Oyster Shop, Little Jack’s Tavern and Workshop.  A few weeks ago, The Harbinger Café & Bakery joined North Central’s ranks, and its name perfectly encapsulates the promise of this new food frontier.

The Harbinger has a half-French, half-hipster feel, with blue-and-white dishware, handmade coffee mugs, and pleasantly muted farmhouse decor.  It’s feminine but not frilly, and its food strikes an equally appealing balance.  The menu is seasonal and local-minded, and a list of the restaurant’s numerous local suppliers is proudly and prominently displayed on a mirror in the front room.  The order counter is a feast for the eyes: it’s covered in a rotating selection of beautiful baked goods, savory tartines and inventive salads, all of which can be enjoyed à la carte or combined into a more substantial meal.  The coffee options range from the standard fare to creative offerings like honey and maple lattés, and a small cold case offers drinks and to-go items.  There’s also a small wine and beer selection for the Harbinger’s weeknight happy hour.

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We’ve now made two lunchtime visits to The Harbinger to try several of the dishes on offer, with the tartines being particular favorites. The “Oh Snap” tartine featured broccoli pesto, sugar snap pea salad, pink radishes, sumac sprinkle and microgreens on Carolina gold rice sourdough from local Root Baking Company.  The vibrant pesto and sweet peas were nicely balanced with the slight sharpness of the lemony sumac, all perched on a thick slice of sourdough from (in our opinion) Charleston’s best bread producer.

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Oh Snap!

The “Garden Party” tartine was our resounding favorite, with sweet onion and snap peas paired with bright cherry tomatoes bursting with summery flavor.  A thick smear of rich herbed aioli paired well with the fresh, seasonal veggies topping the same fantastic bread.

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Garden Party (in your mouth)

Our most recent visit found us enjoying the “Local Lunchbox” tartine and its thick slices of local yellow tomatoes, bell peppers and chives under a layer of sweet potato cilantro hummus.  Despite its heft, it was light enough that we nearly ordered a second.

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Local Lunchbox

The Harbinger also offers a number of house-made pastries and cookies, which never fail to catch the eye of our three-year-old.  He usually enjoys the “Best Friend” cookie, a riff on a classic chocolate chip cookie with three types of chocolate, pearl sugar and Bulls Bay sea salt; it makes us think of a mashup between a chocolate chip cookie and an Oreo in the best possible way.  As parents, we particularly like that the cookies are big enough that our kid doesn’t ask for a second one, but not so big that he’s bouncing off the walls after finishing it (well, no more so than usual).  We’d show you a picture, but on both visits he devoured his “special treat” as soon as we placed it in his hot little hands – you’ll just have to head to the Harbinger and try one (or more) for yourself!


Info:
The Harbinger Café & Bakery website
1107 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403
Monday-Friday: 7am-7pm; Saturday-Sunday: 8am-3pm

 

 

 

 

Cork Dork

When we’re not wining or dining (or chasing our three-year-old), chances are we’re reading – and often, the subject is food or wine.  We both recently devoured Cork Dork, a newly-published account of author Bianca Bosker’s 18-month-long transformation from wine novice to certified sommelier candidate (no spoilers – read the book to see if she passes!).  Bosker gives up her desk job as a tech editor to pursue her new obsession, a journey which leads her into varied corners of the wine world – from elite New York City sommelier tasting groups and restaurants to mass-market California wineries to neuroscience studies on the brain’s receptivity to taste – in an attempt to discern and articulate what makes a great wine.

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Bosker’s balance between enthusiasm and skepticism is what anchors Cork Dork and makes it such an enjoyable yet informative read.  Is all that wine-speak (you know, “this wine is redolent of pencil shavings, bruised red apples and garden hose”) just highfalutin nonsense? Bosker acknowledges that yes, some of it is.  But sommeliers’ tasting notes are more than just pretentious party tricks – they’re grounded in both chemistry and psychology, which Bosker covers without getting too bogged down in the science.  It turns out that smell, our most neglected sense, is key to wine tasting, and the master sommeliers she studies with train with the rigor of professional athletes to be able to blind taste a wine and identify its grape, region, vintage and even producer.   (Some of them lick rocks and smell garbage to refine their sense of smell and refuse to brush their teeth before tastings to avoid messing up their palates – that’s dedication.)

Cork Dork also explores the economic side of wine, from the difference between a $50 bottle and a $500 bottle (often scarcity rather than quality) to the art of the upsell (or occasional downsell) by restaurant sommeliers.  And lest we forget that at the end of the day, wine is meant to be enjoyed, Bosker vividly conveys the pure pleasure (or insanity) wine can bring.  Why is it that the “amazing” bottle you drank on the beach at sunset will never taste as good anywhere or anytime else (the $2-per-bottle Mexican sparkling wine we LOVED on our first kid-free vacation comes to mind!)?  And what’s it like to spend an evening at La Paulée, an absolutely insane-sounding bacchanal dedicated to drinking massive quantities of even-more-massively expensive Burgundies?  Cork Dork will tell you.

“It just makes me happy, you know?  You go somewhere, and you sit at the bar, and you eat good food, and you drink, and then you’re like, ‘Hey, I’m lucky to be alive and to be me.'”

– Darnelle, a waitress at a high-end NYC restaurant, summing up the magic of a good meal and glass of wine in Cork Dork 

As its very long subtitle states, Cork Dork is “A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught [Bosker] to Live for Taste,” but its message resonates much more broadly: take the time to stop and smell the roses (literally), go all in when it matters, and, at the end of the day, trust your senses.  We’ll drink to that.

Une soirée française à Charleston

It’s no secret that we are both Francophiles – we met during our junior year abroad in France, speak the language and adore French food and wine.  We’re always looking to indulge our inner Frenchies, and the recent opening of both a new French restaurant and a new French film here in Charleston seemed like the perfect opportunity to get a babysitter and head out on the town for a soirée française.

When we first moved to Charleston, we quickly fell in love with La Fourchette, a little French bistro on King Street, and were devastated when it suddenly closed in 2013.  Our emotions swung 180 degrees last spring when we heard that La Fourchette’s owner would be opening a new restaurant on Cannon Street (in place of the shuttered Lana, whose chef has now launched Kairos Greek Kitchen, which has quickly become one of our favorite kid-friendly spots).  So when Goulette finally opened a few weeks ago, we knew we had to try it tout de suite!  And while Goulette is not as classically French as La Fourchette was, we were thrilled to find all the components of a great French meal among its menu offerings.

Soups and salads comprise the bulk of Goulette’s appetizers, but we opted to split the shrimp roll to start.  The shrimp roll was surprisingly large and a great first course to share.  A mound of local Charleston shrimp were nestled inside a toasted, top-split brioche roll, dressed in a creamy sauce with just the right amount of dill and a drizzle of lobster oil.  It was also accompanied by the house salade verte, which provided a light counterpoint to the richness of the roll.  Despite its size, we never felt that the roll was too rich or heavy, even on a 90 degree Charleston day.  Our waitress told us that it is Goulette’s most popular appetizer, and we can vouch that it is a great choice to start your meal.

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Goulette’s entree selection is meat-heavy but eclectic, offering French classics alongside pulled pork, fish and chips and grilled shrimp.  Prices range from $16 for the pulled pork up to $26 for the duck confit and lamb chops, and each of the grilled items can be paired with a sauce (basquaise, green peppercorn, coq au vin, gorgonzola or mushroom cream), offered à la carte for an additional $3 or $3.50.

As former devotees of the steak frites at La Fourchette, we gravitated toward the French fare: hanger steak and duck leg confit, both served with heaping portions of fries and more salade verte.  The crispy duck confit (spiced with orange zest, coriander, clove and allspice) was good, but the hanger steak was truly great.  The steak arrived cooked to a perfect medium rare and was served with a dusting of garlic, parsley and (we think) Paremsan cheese.  Tyler opted to include the green peppercorn sauce, which was good but not great; it had a spice note we couldn’t nail down that was slightly overpowering.  We both agreed that we have never encountered hanger steak that tender before.  While one of the more expensive options on the menu at $25, it was $25 very well spent (though we do wish the sauces were included at that price point).  We were also thrilled to find the fries unchanged from the La Fourchette days: double fried in duck fat and completely ducking delicious.

Goulette’s wine list is relatively short but well-cultivated.  It is heavily French, but there were many selections from both the old and new worlds as well as a small by-the-glass selection.  Prices were reasonable, topping out around $80, with the vast majority of bottles under $50.  We settled on the 2012 premier cru from the “Les Vergelesses” vineyard in Savigny-les-Beaune.  2012 was a good vintage for Burgundy, and the wine met our high expectations – it was structured enough to complement the steak and duck, but its relatively light body and low alcohol content prevented it from overwhelming the shrimp roll.  The first sip was much more tannic than we anticipated, but the wine quickly softened in the glass, showing notes of raspberry, cherries and rosemary with just a touch of Burgundy barnyard funk.

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We finished our meal with an order of profiteroles, a classic French bistro dessert.  Four puffs of choux pastry filled with vanilla bean ice cream, drowning in a dark chocolate sauce, were tough to pass up.  The pastry was light with a slight crunch, clearly indicating that they were house-made and not pulled from a freezer.  The Belgian chocolate sauce had a great depth of flavor – rich but not overly so, with a a pleasant bitterness that made us wonder if some fresh coffee had been added.  It was the perfect coda to a meal that stayed true to the French philosophy of focusing on good ingredients prepared well.

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Pleasantly but not overwhelmingly full, we said au revoir to our friendly Belgian waitress and headed to The Terrace, Charleston’s only indie movie theater, to continue our French-food-focused evening with a screening of Paris Can Wait.    The movie centers on Anne (Diane Lane), an American woman being driven from the French Riviera to Paris by her husband’s French colleague, Jacques (Arnaud Viard), after an ear infection prevents her from flying.  What should be a seven-hour drive turns into a multi-day adventure as quirky, food-obsessed Jacques leads Anne on a gastronomic tour through Provence, Lyon and Burgundy.

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The plot is fairly slight – Anne’s at a bit of a crossroads in her life, having closed her business but now catering to her busy movie-producer husband, and Jacques is overtly but not aggressively flirtatious – and the real appeal (for us, anyway) was in the amazing meals, fabulous wine and beautiful landscapes that form the backbone of the film.  Non-Francophiles and non-foodies would likely find the culinary focus and meandering pace of the movie, as well as the lack of subtitles on all of the French dialogue, frustrating.  For us, though, it was like taking a delightful, delicious 90-minute vacation – so much so that, despite our meal at Goulette and our current lack of vacation time, we found ourselves slightly hungry and Googling Paris airfare prices on our drive home.  Paris may have to wait, but we’re glad Charleston’s French food and cultural offerings are strong enough to transport us there, even if only for the evening.


Restaurant Info:

Goulette
98 Cannon Street, Charleston, SC 
Open for dinner; opening soon for lunch
No Internet presence that we can find!

 

 

 

 

Da, Plavina!

“Drink what you know” has become our version of the saying “write what you know.”   On any given night when a bottle of wine is open on our table, it’s likely to from a region or a grape with which we have a long history – whether an elegant, thought provoking Burgundy, a racy and lively Oregon pinot noir, or a leathery, tobacco-spiced Rioja from somewhere near San Sebastian.  This approach has served us very well over the years,and has rarely (if ever) led to a truly disappointing bottle.  

A few weeks ago, however, we decided we wanted to branch out into lesser-known (to us) regions and grapes.  So far, this change of course has led us to some truly memorable bottles.  We’ve enjoyed bottles from all over the Old World, running the gamut from a focused and mineral-driven Gruner Veltliner from Austria to a dark, brooding Ribuero del Duero a friend brought home from Portugal and graciously opened with us.

One bottle, though, was honestly a shocking discovery: the 2015 Plavina from Croatian winemaker Ivica Pilizota.  This was the first bottle of Croatian wine we’ve ever had, but it certainly won’t be our last!  

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Plavina is a red grape indigenous to the Dalmatian Coast, and the Pilizota grapes grow in rocky soil near the Adriatic Sea.  At only 12.7% ABV, our initial thought was that this bottle would be very bright and fruit-forward with relatively high acid and a light, delicate structure.  This Plavina did primarily offer strawberry and red currant characteristics, but they were nicely balanced with a hint of bramble, dewy forest floor and even a little bit of sea air – a great expression of its coastal terroir.

The Pilizota Plavina is an absolute gem of a wine, and it’s a steal at around $16 (for Charleston locals, we found it at Bottles in Mount Pleasant).  For us, it provided an instant flashback to late summer evenings on the Jersey Shore – it’s a glass of sea air and sunsets that we recommend serving slightly chilled, preferably with an ocean view.

V-Dub Vino Score: 94/100

2015 Ivica Pilizota Plavina – 12.7% ABV – $15.99 (SC price)

 

Off the Beaten Path

“Off the Beaten Path” may be a bit of a misnomer for this post given that the featured spots are along Highway 17, one of the main arteries through the Lowcountry, but they are both far enough outside the city of Charleston that they feel like a world apart.

About twenty minutes south of Charleston, the car dealerships, restaurants and strip malls give way to open land in the rural town of Ravenel.  Only a few establishments dot the side of the highway, and three of them are real gems.  One of these is the Caw Caw Interpretive Center, a nature center and wildlife preserve and one of our favorite parks in the area – we won’t dwell on it here since its dining options are limited to vending machines, but we highly recommend a visit when you’re in this neck of the woods!  The other two, Champney’s Blueberry Farm and Ravenel Fresh Seafood, offer unique Lowcountry experiences not to be missed.

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Sure sign of summer in South Carolina!

Champney’s is a family-owned and -operated blueberry farm offering both you-pick and already-harvested blueberries in season (typically, early June to mid-July).   We recommend the you-pick option – coat yourself in sunscreen and bug spray, grab a basket from the open-air farm stand and get picking!  Walking through the vast field of blueberry trees, it’s hard to believe you’re just a stone’s throw from the highway, but you’ll quickly get lost in the moment.

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Blueberry fields forever

This year, the Lowcountry unfortunately got hit with a very late frost (23 degrees in March!), decimating a lot of the local blueberry and peach crops.  Champney’s was not spared, and so the 2017 season will be much more limited than most years’.   With that in mind, we headed to the farm on its opening day this past Saturday.  It was sad to see so many bare trees, but we were very grateful that some of the berries survived so we could enjoy one of our favorites rites of early summer in South Carolina. Even with the smaller crop, we still managed to pick four pounds of blueberries in about an hour.  Jack was actually semi-helpful this year too, though most of the berries he picked went directly into his mouth instead of his basket (and really, who could blame him?  Few things in life taste as good as sun-warmed blueberries straight off the tree).  We definitely rounded up when it came time to pay to make up for his “quality control” – and at a mere $2/lb, we were happy to do so!

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Found one!

Hot and hungry after our time at Champney’s, we headed 10 minutes farther down the road to Ravenel Fresh Seafood.   Somehow this was our first visit to Ravenel Seafood, but it definitely won’t be our last!  The small restaurant is easily visible from the highway thanks to the colorful coastal fishing murals that cover its exterior, and while the interior is more spartan, the food is anything but!

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Fish feast

Everything is made to order, and our fried oysters, whiting and shrimp came out crisp and hot.  The real star, though, was the garlic crabs: steamed, coated in a garlic butter that we are still talking about, served whole and ready to be devoured messily and immediately.  These were seriously SO freaking good that we licked our fingers clean and debated ordering more despite the mountain of fried fish we’d already inhaled.  After throwing in the towel and learning that hand sanitizer removes Old Bay residue quite, well, handily (sorry), we spent the car ride home trying to reverse engineer the garlic butter recipe.

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Garlicky, crabby deliciousness

If you need us this week, we’ll be eating blueberries by the handful and dreaming of those garlic crabs …


Info:

Champney’s Blueberry Farm Facebook page
4492 Rose Lane, Ravenel, SC
2017 season hours: Thursday-Saturday 9am-7pm

Ravenel Fresh Seafood Facebook page
5925 Savannah Highway, Ravenel, SC
Open 10am-7pm, closed Sundays